"Pjila'si"
 
Present day Newfoundland and Labrador is home to four aboriginal peoples
The Inuit, the Innu, the Metis, and the Micmac or Mi'kmaq.

 The Inuit are the descendants of the Thule people who migrated
to Labrador from the Canadian Artic 700 to 800 years ago.

The Innu, formerly known as the Naskapi-Montagnais,
are descended from Algonkian speaking hunter-gatherers
who were one of two Aboriginal peoples
inhabiting Labrador at the time of European arrival.

The Labrador Metis are descendants of Europeans and
Labrador Native people, primarily the Inuit.

The Newfoundland Micmac ( Mi'kmaq ) are found on the island of Newfoundland.
They are descended from Algonkian hunter-gatherers
whose homeland included what is now Nova Scotia,
Prince Edward Island, part of New Brunswick, and the Gaspe peninsula.

 
This page is dedicated to the Micmac (Mi'kmaq) of Newfoundland.

While historians and archaeologists have different views as to when
the Mi'kmaq first came to Newfoundland, the oral tradition
of the Newfoundland Mi'kmaq tells that they were living
in Newfoundland prior to first European contact.

Historical evidence shows that they were living in Newfoundland as early as the 16th century.

If you are interested in the Mi'kmaq culture and history
please follow the links below to learn more about their past, present, and future.
If you know of any Native links not found here, personal or professional,
I would like you to email me so I can add them to this list
Linda Wells
 
The music you are listening to is
Wleyuti
( Amazing Grace and the Lord's Prayer).

It is from a CD produced by
The Miawpukek Mi'kmaq of Conne River

Information on purchasing the cd can be obtained from
"http://www.miawpukek.ca"
Fax number 709(882-2292)
Telephone number 709(882-2470)

This is the most beautiful Aboriginal Music I have ever heard.
The quality is wonderful and inspiring.
The songs represent the history, culture, traditions,
and spiritual beliefs of the Mi'kmaq people.

Dream Graphics 2001

The introductory information on this page was obtained from the web site of
Ralph T. Pastore
of the Archaeology Unit and History Department of
Memorial University of Newfoundland.

The site contains much information about the
Aboriginal Peoples of Newfoundland and Labrador